2016 in Review

Happy New Year!

It’s that time of year again (well, a few days late, but considering how neglectful of this blog I’ve been in the past few months, a few days is nothing!), when we all gaze back on our accomplishments and/or struggles of the previous year. 2016 was certainly an interesting one. Let’s get down to it, shall we?

2015 Goals Recap

A-ha! I had no specific goals for 2016, other than staying healthy and running to enjoy it. Health-wise, well… the start of the year saw me still recovering from a dodgy metatarsal and related bursitis, then I learned that I don’t breathe in the best way possible, which led to a reprise of dodgy ribs, and my knees bothered me off and on. And, while not an injury, I got pregnant a few months into the year and that made running a bit more interesting than usual. On the whole, I think I enjoyed running. For the most part.

In spite of my lack of goals this year, though it took an extra trip around the sun, I did meet 2 of my goals from 2014, namely beating my 5K and 10K PRs (huzzah!). More on that below. I also managed to add one new town to my race map, plus a new country, so that was pretty cool.

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Celebrating a new PR and starting off 2016 happily!

My 2016 in Numbers (Running)

Total miles: 106.84*
*Closest estimate I could get given that I lost my training log from the start of the year and Simon died on me without saving some data

Races completed: 8 (up from 7 in 2015; 3 5Ks, 1 6K, 3 10Ks, 1 half marathon)

States raced in: 3, none new (Massachusetts, Maine, and California; up from 2 in 2015)

MA towns raced in: 3, 1 new (Dedham (new), Lunenburg, and Worcester)

Countries raced in: 2, for the first time! (US and UK)

PRs beaten: 3! 5K, 6K, and 10K

DNSs: none! for the first time!

Firsts and Milestones (Running)

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I unofficially placed first in the Pregnant American division at the QEOP 10K

Firsts and Milestones (Personal)

  • Traveled to my first international conference and visited two new-to-me cities (Dundee and Glasgow)

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    Enjoying a cheeky Clarkies pie in Dundee

  • Sneaked in one last match at White Hart Lane before they started tearing the stadium down (our seats from that match are now a gaping hole in the ground)
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  • Had tea and Turkish Delight at C.S. Lewis’s house
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  • Found out I was going to have a baby… that was a pretty big moment*

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    Already a Spurs fan

  • Attended my second international conference and got to bask in the glory that is Wembley Stadium
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  • Had a mini-reunion with some of my study abroad friends in Colorado, visiting Denver and the new-to-me Fort Collins
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*The whole baby thing continues to be a pretty big moment! Sometimes it still feels completely unreal, despite the Alien situation that’s nearly always happening in my growing bump. And speaking of the growing bump…

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August 16

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August 29

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September 3, post-QEOP 10K, when I realized I had officially outgrown my clothes and had to make an emergency Primark run for a shirt that wouldn’t expose my belly

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October 3

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October 22, bump buddies!

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November 19

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December 23

I look absolutely HUGE in that last picture… I don’t think the angle helps πŸ˜‰

So, yeah. 2016 had a lot going on. And that’s not even taking into account the state of the world with Brexit, Syria, Standing Rock, the US election, and all the seemingly endless other things that gave this year a general feeling of despair. If I’m honest, I’m finding it hard to be hopeful about 2017 as a whole, and it’s all a bit overwhelming. So in light of that, here are my goals/things to focus on for the year:

  1. Get this baby out safely and make his little world as cozy, safe, and full of love as possible.
  2. As soon as I get the OK from my midwife, jump back on the running wagon. I’ve been missing running like crazy, and the new jogging stroller is all assembled and ready to go!
  3. Related to above, I’m hoping to be fit enough to run the Worcester Firefighters race in June. I’d like to keep that streak going!
  4. Read. Read for fun, read to learn, read fiction, read non-fiction, read newspapers. Try to balance staying informed with staying sane.
  5. Do good, no matter how small, whenever and wherever I can.

Wishing you all a happy, healthy, hopeful 2017!

How was your 2016?

What was your favorite thing that happened last year, running-wise or not?

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park 10K, 3 September 2016

What: 10K

Where: London, UK (course map*) aka, my first international race!

*This wasn’t the exact course we ended up running, due to another event being set up for later in the day. We ended up going down by the stadium on the “Old River Path” a few times.

Who: Just me, with moral support from Drew

Time: 1:17:49

Splits: none, because Simon failed me, losing all memory of the race as soon as I paused him at the end. Boo.

Note: This recap is way overdue. Please see my last post for excuses!

Background

You may be asking, “What the heck were you doing running a race this far afield? London??” That is a good question, observant reader(s). A few days prior to this race, I was attending a conference for work in Wembley…

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Quick pause for a Wembley Stadium selfie!

Having attempted to run an international race a few years back but being thwarted by a race cancellation, I really wanted to fit one in this time around. However, I didn’t want to take over an entire day of sightseeing or what-have-you just so I could get some foreign bling, plus I wasn’t sure how ever-more-pregnant me would handle a 10K. I figured I’d see how Beach 2 Beacon went, and would decide then. Since B2B went quite well, and with Drew’s supportive “you never know when you’ll get another chance to run a race in London… go for it” in my head, I searched for races and landed on the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park 10km Series.

The race sounded pretty cool – running around a park where Olympians roamed four years ago?? – and came with bling and a goody bag, so I was won over pretty easily. I signed up, found a hotel close to the Overground which would allow for easy transit to the race, and eagerly awaited the big day.

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A view of (part of) Olympic Park

Pre-race

After I carboloaded with some tasty ramen the night before, race day dawned not-so-bright and early. I was pleased with the overcast sky that looked like it would spit rain at any moment… at home it was still in the high 80s and I had been looking forward to cool race weather!

Drew and I hopped on the Overground and made our way to Hackney Wick, then strolled to and through Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. We had stayed nearby a few years ago, when the park was still at the early stages of reconstruction, so it was fun to see all the work that had been done since. We had the ArcelorMittal Orbit (the weird reddish tower in the above photo) as a homing beacon, and it led us to the race start area and packet pickup. Pickup was super easy and quick, and I spent the rest of pre-race time trying to both stay warm and poke my own pin holes through the bib, which didn’t come with any pre-made.

After a very half-hearted warmup on my part, a man with a megaphone (who shall henceforth be referred to as Megaphone Man) started strolling through the crowd of runners, reminding us all to double-knot our laces and treating us to witty banter in a Cockney accent. He then led us all in a group warm-up:

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(Note the not-so-overcast sky in those pictures… I was beginning to regret not bringing a hat or sunglasses at this point.)

After some butt-kicks and jumping jacks and sky punches, we made our way over to the 2012 Walk, where the start/finish line was. It was nice and shaded, and looked charming, and I had hope in my heart that it would be a lovely race:

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The start from Drew’s point of view…

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…and from my point of view at the back

The race

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Drew caught a picture of a bunch of charity runners dressed as monkeys

I wanted so badly to take off with most of the rest of the pack when the starting gun went, but I forced myself to hang back and take it easy. Though B2B had gone well, a month had passed since that race, and I was now carrying more baby weight and was unsure of how my body would handle running 10k.

The first little portion of the race was decent – down the shady flat path, marveling at the fact that I was actually running a race in another country – and both Drew and the race photographer caught me looking chuffed to be running:

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Photo: Drew

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Photo: Basil Thornton

Not long after those smiley pictures, however, things went downhill. It was hot. And sunny. I was thoroughly unprepared for hot and sunny. I hadn’t hydrated enough (surprise!), hadn’t brought water like almost everyone else had, and hadn’t brought sunglasses or a hat, so I was squinty and worried about sunburn. Plus, I was really feeling the extra baby weight. Things were more jiggly and, as a result, quite sore, and I also got out of breath very quickly. I had to stop to walk before the first mile clicked by.

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Stopping to walk meant I could take pictures!

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And then I started to run so I could take a running selfie. I was all ready to be done!

The course was mostly exposed to direct sun, so I was hot and red and sweaty and unhappy pretty quickly. There were also more hills than expected; the race description mentioned “slight undulations” but we had to scale some steep ramps to get onto bridges, and our detour included more hills than the usual route. I walked a lot, more than usual (with my midwife’s “listen to your body, stop whenever you get any pain” echoing in my head), and found myself soon getting lapped by the lead runners.

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About to get lapped by fast people

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Trying to muster a smile for Drew

Right after the above picture was taken, the course took us past a huge crowd of cheering people. Drew later told me that Megaphone Man had rallied a bunch of random passersby together so that we could have a cheering section! That was a fun little surprise.

The first water stop wasn’t too long after, and I savored my drink as I took a slow walk break in the shade. I had two laps to go, and I was mentally and physically done already. I strongly considered stopping, since I knew Drew was close by, but then I thought of the finisher’s medal and how I didn’t want to have my first international race also be my first DNF. So I soldiered on.

I started to hate the scenery. Three laps of the same thing gets very old when you no longer want to be running, no matter where you are. I kept taking frequent walk breaks, pausing every now and then to shove a Percy Pig – my chosen fuel – in my gob. (While tasty, those little suckers are hard to chew while walking, let alone running! I missed my Honey Stingers.)

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Struggling up a hill on the last lap

Two of the course marshals helped me carry on – one saw me struggling during the first lap and yelled out encouragement, then remembered me on subsequent laps and kept saying awesome things to me. The other saw the Shamrock on my singlet and said things as I struggled past, but her Irish accent was so thick I couldn’t make out her words! They sounded friendly though, and I like to think she was looking out for me especially because of the Shamrock. Seeing Drew at the end of each lap was a huge help too!

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Struggling up the last hill!

I can’t even express how happy I was to crest that final hill, knowing the finish line was close! I considered trying for a sprint finish, but the worrywart in the back of my head didn’t want to overdo it.

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Nearing the finish!

And then Megaphone Man appeared. I was a little ways behind the lady in front of me, and as he saw the two of us approaching, he started yelling that we should “make it a race!” and have a photo finish. The other lady had earbuds in and didn’t speed up at all, despite his goading her:

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Megaphoning into her ear

So he turned his megaphone on me and started shouting encouragement, urging me to beat the lady in red. So I thought, what the heck? I enjoy the first picture in this next series (all courtesy of Basil Thornton), because you can see the exact moment I tried to kick it up a notch – arms flailing and goofy look on my face:

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Clearly I didn’t beat the lady in red (she was going just a little too fast for me to catch up, though I did get close!), but I did manage to remember what Megaphone Man told us all we had to do at the finish – put our hands up. He joked that results wouldn’t count if our hands weren’t up, and that made looking through the race photos pretty fun – almost everyone has their hands up!

I made a bee-line for the water table, sucked down a couple cups’ worth (I was one of the last finishers, so didn’t think taking multiple cups was bad), and then stumbled off to get my goody bag and bling.

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So red, so sweaty, so tired… so happy to be done

I then made Drew hang out for a bit so I could hop up on the podium they had set up. Clearly I hadn’t won anything, but other people were leaping up for photo opportunities and I decided it would probably be the only time I’d have a podium picture, so darnit, I was going to make it happen:

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I can almost safely say that I was indeed the first place preggers American!

Mission accomplished, we set off for Stratford tube station, making a quick stop at Marks and Spencers so I could get some food to refuel (the recovery drink in the goody bag had sucralose in it – boo!). I got some interesting looks as I stood in the corner of the mall between M&S and the tube station, sweaty and wearing tiny shorts while pounding a milky coffee beverage and shoving chocolate in my face, but whatever – I had just finished my first international race despite really wanting to DNF, and was enjoying my runner’s high.

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Bling

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Goody bag contents

In the end, I’m so happy I opted to run a race while in London, even if I had been cursing myself while running the thing. I may have finished 313th out of 327 runners (91st out of 99 ladies), but I finished! And, once the runner’s high kicked in and my body forgot about the pain and exhaustion, I realized I’d even had a bit of fun too. It was a cool experience to run through an Olympic park, let alone experiencing an international race for the first time, and it will be fun to tell my wee running buddy about it someday πŸ™‚

Beach to Beacon 10K, 6 August 2016

What: 10K

Where: Cape Elizabeth, Maine (course map)

Who: Me and a bunch of Shammies, with moral support from Drew

Time: 1:22:40

Splits: (according to Simon)
-Mile 1: 11:13
-Mile 2: 15:49*
-Mile 3: 15:24*
-Mile 4: 12:06
-Mile 5: 11:36
-Mile 6: 13:13
-Mile 6.2: 3:22

*These two mile splits include porta-potty stops:

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Two giant canyons in the first half represent long, long porta-potty stops. The other dips are walks up hills.

Check out my race review on BibRave!

Running in the footsteps of giants:

Two quick points about this race, to set the stage:

  1. It’s Joan Benoit Samuelson‘s race, and the course apparently follows her training route. That’s pretty stinkin’ cool.
  2. History was made this year, as native Mainer Ben True became the first American to win the race in its 19-year history. (Note: his winning time, 28:17, is faster than my best 5K time. Mind = blown.)

The background:

Beach to Beacon has been on my radar ever since I joined the Shammies. A contingent of the club heads north every year to run, and I’ve heard so many stories about what a great race it is, how fun it is, how you get to run with elites and sometimes even see Joanie, etc.

The more I heard, the more I wanted to run. The only problem is that it’s a notorious race in terms of getting in; this year, general registration sold out in less than 4 minutes! Most Shammies end up getting in by entering the team lottery, but it’s not always a given that they’ll get to run.

Well, luckily for me, general registration opens at 7am, exactly when I’m usually standing at my bus stop killing time on my phone. On that fateful day in March, I was stood on the sidewalk with my phone poised, and I somehow squeaked in within that 3:43 window. It was the second time the magical race gods were smiling upon me, and I was pretty smiley myself!

The expo:

Drew and I left work early on Friday to attempt to beat weekend traffic, but still wound up sitting on the highway for 4+ hours (it usually takes about 2). We still managed to arrive in Cape Elizabeth in time to hit the expo, which I was pumped about. With the exception of the Boston Marathon expo I sneaked into during a volunteer stint, I’d never experienced a race expo before.

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Inside the expo at Cape Elizabeth High School

Granted, it wasn’t very big, but I was still nerdily excited to be at my first expo! Bib pickup was well organized and quick (other Shammies said it took forever earlier in the day), and my bib came with a nice Nike Dri-Fit t-shirt and a car magnet. More goodies came in the expo, too: gift cards to LL Bean, Olympia Sports, and Dunkin Donuts, as well as free reusable grocery bags and snacks provided by Clif Bar and a local pasta place. Not too shabby! There were vendors and run clubs there too, but by that point Drew and I were hungry and wanted to eat an actual meal.

After a tasty, tasty dish of homemade gnocchi at Enio’s (go there if you’re ever in South Portland!), we returned to our Airbnb and settled in for an early night’s sleep.

Pre-race:

We were up with the sun, literally, on race morning:

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Sunrise over SoPo

I’ve never run a race big enough to need shuttle buses and such, so I’m not used to crazy-early wake-ups. 5:20 felt way too early! I stumbled around, donned my kit, shoved some mini stroopwafel (thank you, Kennebunk Service Plaza for surprising me with those treats!) and water down my throat, and then Drew was driving me to a shuttle point.

Another first for me – a point-to-point course. I’ve always run loops or out-and-backs, or point-to-points where the start and finish are so close that they’re not even considered point-to-points. So this made logistics interesting in terms of getting to the start, finding Drew at the finish, and the like.

Anyway, I squeezed onto the 6:20 shuttle (a good, old-fashioned yellow school bus) and we trundled down lovely wooded back roads for 5-10 minutes before arriving at the start area. And what a start area it was! I’ve never seen so many porta-potties – with every 4 alternating which way they were facing so all the lines weren’t on one side – plus there were so many volunteers! Some were staffing water and snack tables, which also had Gatorade and coffee, and some were loading up gear bag buses. I felt like I was in the big-time!

I was supposed to meet up with the rest of the Shammies at 6:45, so I had some time to kill. I ate the Clif Bar I’d gotten at the expo, wandered back to the tables to get some Gatorade, and pretty much just people-watched until I saw a bunch of green singlets coming my way.

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I love these ladies!

I also shoved a Honey Stinger waffle in my face (which is why I look so goofy in the above photo – I was chewing), not because I wanted to eat it, but because I didn’t want to carry it and no one else seemed to want it. Oh well, one can never have too many pre-race waffles… right?

We chatted and killed time until we heard the national anthem, then we walked over to take our various places at the starting line. Shammies E and K hung out with me near the back of the pack; it was going to be a hot day (“sneaky heat,” as one article called it later, due to high humidity and dew point) and we wanted to enjoy the day and each other’s company without needing a trip to the medical tent.

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View from the back(ish) of the pack… you can just make out the balloon arch where the starting line was

The race:

The wheelchair athletes had started around 7:30 (I think), and the elite women took off at 8 on the dot. Elite men and the rest of us (who were a respectable distance behind the elite corral) got our start at 8:12. It took us about 8 minutes to cross the start from when the race actually started.

The first mile was nice and chill. E, K, and I were going fast enough that my conversation was broken up with lots of breathing pauses, but not so fast that it was uncomfortable. All of a sudden, we saw balloons up ahead signalling the first mile – huh? E and I were both having some race nerves and decided to pull over at the porta-potty, and K ran off with a fellow runner who she had started chatting with about his t-shirt. We stood in line for about 5 minutes, realized we didn’t really have to go after all, and carried on.

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Looking relatively fresh and happy when the first photographer appeared

Mile 2 flew by as quickly as the first and, again, I made the decision to pull over at the aid stop’s porta-potty. E was being a trooper and running my race with me, so she grabbed us some waters and waited. It was another long wait, and my nerves were still playing tricks on me, so we set off once again.

Honestly, the rest of the race is a blur. Thanks to those epic porta-potty stops, I ran my personal worst time-wise… though it’s heartening to know that if I shaved those ~10 minutes off, I would have ran about my usual time in spite of the heat. So that’s cool! But despite the slow time, it was seriously the fastest race ever. The mile markers were flying at us, and E and I kept saying how quickly the race was going. It must have been the great company! We chatted up a storm the entire way.

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There were at least 4 photographers at Mile 5, where there’s a gorgeous ocean view behind the runners, but unfortunately we’re in focus, not the view!

The awesome crowds and scenery helped, too! I’ve never run a race with so many spectators, and they went all out to cheer for us. Though my name has been on bibs before, this was the first race where people actually cheered for me by name (such a cool feeling!), and people were ringing cowbells, holding witty signs, blasting motivational music (I remember E and I singing along to the Rolling Stones as we crested a hill), and even passing out bacon (Beach to Bacon, get it?). I truly felt like a rock star… a very red, tired one with a sheen of sweat, but a rock star nonetheless.

The course ends with a few steep hills, one of which is in Fort Williams Park. That part of the race was a little disheartening… you run into the park and up the “final hill,” and I sort of expected the race to end there. But no. We wound through a section of the park, curve after curve, with the end nowhere in sight. It was such a relief to finally see the balloon arch in the distance, and I zeroed in on it. Little did I know Drew was practically right next to me, shouting my name! E spotted him and posed for a silly picture as I stared off at the finish:

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At last we victoriously crossed the finish line. The Shammies had warned me that it would be a while before I could get my hands on some water (seriously, one of my biggest race pet peeves), so as soon as I crossed the line I had my eyes peeled for the far-off land of water tables. I was so focused that I jumped a little when E said “Thanks, Joanie!” and when I looked in front of me, there she was! Less than an arm’s length away – Joan Benoit Samuelson! I managed to say “Thanks, Joanie!” and she looked at me and smiled as I lurched past, wondering if it would be improper to take a picture with her. (I decided not to, even though I kind of regret it now!)

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Here we come -the finish at last!

Post-race:

E and I kept walking down the finishing chute, up a steep grassy knoll, and at last reached the far-off water tables. Drew found us, and together we all walked through the park to find the chocolate milk – our designated Shammies meeting point. We found the chocolate milk stand (unlimited free, ice cold, local chocolate milk!) and the rest of the Shammies, and I collapsed into a heap on the grass. There was a massive food tent with crackers, cheese, yogurt, blueberries, granola bars, trail mix, etc. etc. etc. as well as vendor tables, but I was so tired I couldn’t bring myself to traipse around anymore. And anyway, Drew was carrying a paper sack full of goodies from Scratch bakery, so we tucked into a raspberry coffeecake.

Despite my lethargy, Fort Williams Park was a really cool place to end a race, with a huge expanse of grass to splay out on, bits of old forts to climb on, a little beach with some Atlantic Ocean to cool off in, and Portland Head Light, the beacon we ran to:

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Photo credit: Drew

We sat around, chatting and eating snacks and comparing our race experiences (which ranged from our fastest getting 7th in his age group – in a race with 6,600 runners – to E and I hitting personal worsts) for just under and hour, and then set off for some much-needed showers. The Shammies did what Shammies do and hit downtown Portland for some well earned beers, while I attacked one of Scratch’s famous Super Duper Cinnamon Rolls:

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Freshly showered with a cinnamon bun the size of my head

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Now that’s what I call recovery!

Overall thoughts:

I absolutely adored this race. Despite my personal worst, despite my pet peeve water situation, despite lack of bling, this is a race I want to run every year for the foreseeable future! The course, the scenery, the crowds, Joanie!, and all the little details made it a fantastic race to run. It’s clear that it was a race created by a runner, and it’s also run by the same race director who runs the Boston Marathon. These people know what they’re doing, and know how to put on a good race! The registration fee is a little steep at $50, but for what you get, I think it’s worth it. I mean, the gift cards from the expo make up half that cost, plus there are plenty of 5Ks around Boston that cost $35-$40 and all you get is a pint glass. B2B is the race for me!

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My dodgy gait and I love this race!

One final thought:

Drew and I opted to walk the 2 miles back to our Airbnb from the finish line, since traffic was ridonk. However, after all my failed pit stops during the race – and no thanks at all to the most disgusting porta-potties I’ve ever seen after the race – it was an uncomfortable walk back, to say the least. Enter The Cookie Jar, a lovely little bakery on our route. They let me use their gloriously clean real bathroom, and we returned the next morning for breakfast as a thank you. People rave about Holy Donut in Portland, but seriously – if you’re ever in South Portland and like donuts, you must stop at Cookie Jar! Maple glazed donut + Maine blueberry coffee = excellent way to cap off an excellent race weekend.

An Apologetic Travel Post

Oh hello there. I’m guilty (once again) of neglecting my blog, and I apologize (once again) for the radio silence! If you follow me on Instagram, you may have seen a recent collage of travel photos… I offer you more now as an apology and a distraction from my pathetic-of-late running life.

Not much exciting – or anything at all, actually – has been going on with me running-wise for nearly a month, and this past week was spent doing a lot of catch-up and a lot of sleeping after I spent the previous week in the UK for a conference and a bit of collateral sightseeing with Drew, who was able to tag along.

The conference was in Dundee, Scotland, a city I had never visited before. And while the conference was fantastic and engaging and gave me a lot to think about as well as a rekindled enthusiasm for my chosen career, I was disappointed that we had scheduled our trip in such a way that didn’t leave a lot of time for exploring the city. We did a bit of wandering in the mornings to find coffee and Greggs:

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And I nipped out at lunch one of the days to get pies from Clark’s, a Dundee bakery, after being scolded by fellow conference delegates for my puzzling Greggs love:

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We squeezed our two days in Dundee between one day each in Edinburgh and Glasgow, doing touristy things like gawking at Edinburgh Castle:

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And eating haggis with neeps and tatties:

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And enjoying the Duke of Wellington’s jaunty traffic cone hat:

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And checking out the sweet view from the top of the Glasgow Necropolis:

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We saw some nice views from the train as we trundled around Scotland, like this picturesque glimpse of Perth:

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After a too-short whirlwind of Scotland, we flew down to London for a few days. When I found out I was being sent to the conference in Dundee, Drew checked the schedule for the soccer/football team we support, and as luck would have it, they had a home match for the following weekend. As even more luck would have it, we somehow managed to get tickets to the match, so on Sunday we found ourselves at White Hart Lane in Tottenham:

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…where we watched our club beat Manchester United at home for the first time since 2001. That was pretty cool.

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We also took a day trip to Oxford, and visited my favorite library, the one that made me decide to become a librarian all those years ago:

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We did some touristy things, like poke our noses into the quads of some colleges and eat lunch in the Covered Market:

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We also did something a bit out of the ordinary – we visited C.S. Lewis’s house, The Kilns, and had tea in his study:

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A friend of mine is living there right now, and kindly had us over for tea, a little tour, and some Turkish Delight. It was a bit surreal, and very cool.

And so, a flight home and a few days of jet lag later and here I am. When I last left you, I had homework from my running clinic – breathing exercises and band walks – as well as an interval plan to get me running again. Have I done any of that? Of course not. (Raise your hand if you’re surprised!)

After my last post, I spent the days leading up to this trip running around like crazy to get things sorted at work and ready for travel, and I’ve been so tired on this flip side that I’ve been severely unmotivated, even more so than usual. And, after all the pies I ate, that is very unfortunate, as I could use some exercise right about now! (Thankfully we walked many, many miles during the trip, so my GetFit numbers didn’t plummet pathetically.)

Tomorrow, however, is a new day. It is also the day before the Boston Marathon. And so, in the spirit of the race and the atmosphere that settles onto the city on this weekend every year, I’m going to makes my glorious return to running then. I’m guessing it won’t be pretty, but it will happen. I’m sure I’ll let you know how it goes πŸ™‚

How have you been these last few weeks?

Ever been to Scotland?

Will you follow the Marathon at all on Monday?

Airplanes, Pastries, and a Dodgy Foot

Oh, hey there, strangers. Remember me? The last time I posted – nearly a month ago – I had fallen off the Couch to 5K wagon thanks to some crazy-pants blisters.

And then: radio silence.

Sorry for that. I was pretty much being a bad blogger and a bad runner. BUT, I have a good excuse. One of Drew’s best friends from high school invited us to his wedding… in Corsica.

At first we scoffed, thinking of the amount of money and vacation time needed for a trip like that. And then we thought, “when are we ever going to have a reason again to go to Corsica? We may never go, and here we have a reason.” Apart from my insane number of DNS races this year we’ve been pretty frugal, and what good is vacation time if you don’t use it, right? So we bit the bullet.

Not only was this fancy-pants wedding in Corsica, but it was also held at a convent that was built around 1260. It was like a dream:

Β  Since the cheapest flight to Europe we could find was to Amsterdam, we also took the opportunity to visit some family of mine in the Netherlands, and explore a totally new-to-me country, which was awesome:

Looking at the North Sea from a dike

Trying out some wooden shoes

Token windmill shot

Geeking out

Since getting to Corsica is kind of difficult and flights only go in and out on certain days, we found ourselves with a day-long layover in Toulouse:

IMG_4546 And after Corsica, we splurged on a whirlwind trip to two cities neither of us had ever been to before- Venice and Vienna:

Geeking out at yet another library

All in all, in 2 1/2 weeks, we:

  • took 9 flights (God bless EasyJet)
  • took 3 trains
  • took 1 regular bus and 1 water bus
  • hit 5 countries
  • tried our best to adapt to 6 languages (Dutch, Frisian, French, Italian, German, and English with many different accents)
  • ate ALL the pastries and drank ALL the coffee

Trying to be good and fully recovered from my blisters from hell, I brought running gear with every intention of getting back on the horse. Our first real chance to run came in Amsterdam, but we walked about a million miles while there and figured that probably covered our exercise.

And then I hurt my foot in Toulouse, our next stop. I have no idea what I did, but it started hurting as we walked, and only got worse while we were in Corsica. I’m sure all the walking I continued to do on it didn’t help, but what could I do? I thought trying to run on it would be pushing my luck, and so alas. The best made plans of mice and men….

Because this is the year of my running discontent when it comes to injuries, of course it still hurts. It hurts to flex my toes, hurts to walk too much, and hurts even to put a sock on. What the heck. I have a visit with my ol’ pal the orthopedist later this week and hopefully it’s not terrible news. I need to run again so I can burn off all my pastry weight!

IMG_5027How have you been these past few weeks?

Anyone else have a weakness for pastries?
I’m currently in love with the stroopwafel I brought back from Holland!

Ever had a sharp pain on the top of your foot while walking or running?
Mine is right in the center of my foot, but only hurts on the top.

Couch to 5K: Week 4… kind of

Right. So. Couch to 5K. That was going well, wasn’t it? Weeks One, Two, and Three went along swimmingly, and I was seeing results as I tried to fix my gait.

So what happened?

I could say “Cleveland happened,” because it did – I spent last week (Sunday through Friday) in Cleveland, Ohio at the Society of American Archivists conference, which seems like it could be a good excuse. However, I totally nailed Days 1 and 2 of Week 4 while in Cleveland (I’ll elaborate below), so that’s not it.

What then? Two things: 1) bloody great blisters, and 2) dodgy knee acting up again. Those coupled to totally destroy not only the final installment of Week 4, but also two (2) races planned for this past weekend. Sigh.

Before we get to my tales of woe, let’s see how the good parts of running went last week, shall we?

Week 4, Day 1

I was concerned about how I’d carry on with C25K while in Cleveland… I really wanted to run around the city and explore, but I never really feel comfortable running in new-to-me places by myself, especially not at night, which is when most of my free time would be. So I decided to try out my hotel’s fitness center, something I’ve meant to do in the past but had never gotten around to doing. My plan was to treadmill it in the hotel either Sunday night after I landed or Monday night, and then try to get out for an early(ish) morning run on Wednesday, the one day I actually had some free(ish) time during daylight hours.

Well, I arrived at the hotel around 7:30pm on Sunday, exhausted from traveling and so, so hungry… except all the restaurants I could find downtown were closed. I had to settle with a handful of snacks from the hotel lobby, and was in no mood to run. Monday it would have to be.

Monday dawned wicked early after a night of terrible sleep, and I spent all day sat in a workshop learning about how to code finding aids with EAD. Riveting stuff. I had a little adventure trying to figure out the public transport to get back to my hotel, and when I finally arrived, I just wanted to collapse in bed for the rest of the night. Well… and eat an actual meal first. My roommate and I went out for some yummy rice bowls, and THEN all I wanted to do was collapse in bed for the rest of the night.

But I didn’t!

Maybe it was because of a strangely intense desire to use a hotel fitness center for the first time ever, or maybe it was because I wanted to burn off some of the massive rice bowl I had just eaten, or maybe it was because the structure of C25K was exactly what I needed and I felt motivated… whatever the reason, I just felt like I needed to run. So as my roommate got cozy in bed with a book and said she’d babysit my Blerch, I got changed and went for a run.

photo(9)The fitness center was really nice – 3 treadmills, some free weights, an elliptical, and a stationary bike or two, all in a clean, airy room with towels and water. I don’t know what I was expecting, but this one exceeded whatever questionable expectations I had. There was another person in there, otherwise I would have taken pictures of the whole room… and better pictures of me running to prove I was actually doing it… but alas.

C25K jumped up to jogs of 3:00 and 5:00 this week, and I totally killed it. Killed. It. My form felt right (and looked right (I think?) whenever I sneaked glances of myself in the mirror) and I banged out the 5:00 ones feeling like I could run forever. It was awesome. I wasn’t using Simon because I don’t have the treadmill adaptor thingie for him, and C25K had no idea what I was doing because I was on a treadmill, so I don’t know my pace, but it looks like I traveled a little shy of 2 miles according to the treadmill:

photo(10)The only thing that wasn’t good about this run was the way my feet were hitting the belt. No matter what adjustments I made, I kept landing on my forefoot, like on my toes, and couldn’t get myself to land normally (well, “normally” for me is heel-striking, so do with that what you will). My run felt so great that it didn’t seem like a huge problem at the time – just a little weird – but my calves were SO angry for the next few days.

…And it probably didn’t help that I didn’t stretch afterward either… oops. *ashamed face*

Week 4, Day 2

I was determined to run around Cleveland this week, in spite of the insane humidity and higher-than-ideal heat (though, to be fair, it was significantly cooler in Cleveland than back home this week!). Though Wednesday was my one day to sleep in if I so chose, I decided to get up early(ish) to fit in a run before it got too hot:

photo(1)My hotel was just a few blocks south of such sights as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so I planned my route to go by some of the cool places on offer, like said Rock Hall:

photo(11)…and Voinovich Park, which offered a pretty view of downtown:

photo(13)…and a gratuitous selfie to prove that I was, in fact, there:

photo(12)The first half of my run wasn’t too bad… it was way more humid than I would have liked, and I was cursing the long-sleeved shirt I was wearing (chosen in order to protect my still-raw newest tattoo, which can’t be exposed to the sun or have sunblock on it) which, contrary to its name, didn’t keep me very cool at all (thanks a lot, Adidas ClimaCool…).

However, after cruising along more-or-less happily down to the Rock Hall and by Lake Erie, the Science Museum, and First Energy Stadium (home of the Browns), I realized that I had to run uphill to get back to downtown. And I was struggling pretty intensely because of the humidity. I think I actually swore out loud at my C25K app when it told me to run for 5:00!

I paused the app while I waited for the lights to change at an intersection, and I was so grateful for the break; I was not having a good time. I was considering giving up and just walking the rest of the way back to my hotel when I spotted this out of the corner of my eye:

photo(14)

(Apologies for the terrible lighting in this picture!)

…a statue of Jesse Owens in the cute little Fort Huntington Park. How’s that for serendipitous?! Turns out he was a Cleveland native in addition to being all kinds of awesome. Feeling inspired, I restarted my app and ran the rest of the workout… slower than recent workouts, but I still ran it! (Thanks, Jesse!)

Though incomplete because Simon had a hard time finding a signal among the skyscrapers and I was too impatient to wait, you can see from the graph in the data how much more I struggled compared to during recent workouts:

wk4day2Week 4, Day 3

This is where I would have written about the fun 80s-themed 5K that Julie and I were going to run together (maybe along with our C25K apps?) the Friday I got back from Cleveland, but alas. One thing we didn’t consider when we signed up for this race was Friday afternoon traffic heading north to the beaches and NH/Maine from Boston… traffic we would be sitting in for hours to get to this race, which was by the beach in Salisbury. Yup.

Julie texted me while I was still in Cleveland to point this out, along with the fact that it was supposed to be wicked rainy that day. Had it been nice weather, we could have just tried to go up early to beat the traffic and then shook out our car-tired legs with a walk on the beach or what have you. Instead, we would have had to huddle somewhere, likely the car, until the start of the race, and then run in the rain. It didn’t sound pleasant, especially as Julie had an epic bike ride planned for the next day. So we opted to DNS. (I know, I know.)

Julie had spotted another fun-sounding race for that Sunday and,Β being awesome, offered to pay my registration fee. We decided to go for it… and then The Attack of the Killer Blisters happened.

hofSee those sandals I’m wearing in that picture, readers? They’re basically flip flops that are slightly fancy and have a little wedge. I’ve worn them before and they were super comfortable, and I chose them to wear at the conference reception for that very reason. And then they turned on me. It felt like tiny needles were poking into my big toes, and I was practically lame the entire night. Somehow I walked the several blocks back to my hotel (the wine I gulped may have helped ease the pain a bit), but woke up the next morning with giant, Run Fatboy Run-style blisters on each toe.

I was so relieved that I didn’t have to run a race Friday night, because I could barely walk. And then I was gimpy all day Saturday too, and still in significant pain that night. I texted Julie to wimp out of the next morning’s race, which I felt terrible about. But – here’s the rub, readers – I’m going on vacation very soon, one that will involve much walking, and I did not want to make my feet an even worse mess by running on painful blisters. Alas.

Did I mention my dodgy knee too? Yeah, so, that happened. I was walking to the T after work on Monday and my right knee got so painful out of nowhere that I started limping. It was doing so well!! I may have to blame all the sitting I did at the conference, along with plane rides and general lack of activity over the weekend as I recovered from conferencing. I’m just hoping it will be okay during said vacation… cross your fingers for me!

How’s your training going?

Ever been attacked by giant blisters?

California Dreamin’

If you didn’t happen to notice the exotic location of my last race, I recently got back from a trip to California. I tried to be good and schedule a few posts to go up in my absence, but I also managed to completely miss linking up my linkup post (d’oh!) and managed to fall way behind on blog reading. Now that I’ve caught up for the most part, here’s a brief recap of my travels:

American Library Association Annual Conference

Highlights include committee meetings, poster sessions, tooling around the exhibit hall to get some swag, and chatting about tattoos with the creators of the webcomic Unshelved who, upon finding out where I work, launched into a plan to arrive at my archive with hollow teeth filled with squid ink. Bizarre, but hilarious of you were there, I promise!

Super Librarian!

Super Librarian!

San Francisco

The ALA conference was in SF, a city I had never visited before. I’m lucky to have a couple of hospitable friends who put us up in their place on Mount Sutro:

Looking up at a fog-covered Mt Sutro

Looking up at a fog-covered Mount Sutro

Walking through Sutro Forest

Walking through Sutro Forest

In addition to ALA business, I made sure to leave some time to be touristy…

Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

Cable cars

Cable cars

Alcatraz (and just a spot of wind)

Alcatraz (and just a spot of wind)

Our hosts also took us on an excursion out of the city, first to their favorite winery in the Santa Cruz Mountains, then to Big Basin Redwoods State Park:

Inside a redwood tree

Inside a redwood tree

Drew likes to climb things

Drew likes to climb things

Roadtrip

We left SF after a few days and made our way down Route 1 toward Los Angeles. Highlights include:

-The National Steinbeck Center in Salinas:

Steinbeck's truck "Rocinante" from Travels with Charley

Steinbeck’s truck “Rocinante” from Travels with Charley

-The gorgeous coastline!

sf9

Bixby Bridge

Bixby Bridge

-Stopping for breakfast and lunch in cool towns like Cambria and San Luis Obispo:

SLO mission

SLO mission

-Solvang, a little piece of Denmark nestled in the Santa Ynez Valley:

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Los Angeles

I don’t have too many pictures from this part of the trip… I’ve been to LA a few times now to visit the in-laws so I wasn’t as snap happy as I was in new-to-me places farther north. However, I did take a few in the Ballona Wetlands, where I ran my #RunRideHydrate virtual race, as well as this one of apocalyptic-looking fireworks in Marina del Rey, thanks to a bunch of fog:

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Mushroom cloud, anyone?

It was a fun trip, but exhausting and now jet lag has me firmly in its grip! Hopefully I’ll get back to East Coast mode soon.

Have you ever been to California?

If you live there or have visited, what are some of your favorite places to go/things to see?